Random Ramblings

Random Ramblings: Personal observations on a wide variety of subjects. Photographs of creatures and things that are taken on seeing the unusual as well as everyday things.

Standard bulbs conversion to Energy bulbs

I found a handy little way of how to tell which bulbs to buy when converting from standard light bulbs to energy saving light bulbs.

The energy light bulb wattage is multiplied by five to find out its equivalent in a standard light bulb.

Example:

Energy Saving bulb 20W x 5 = 100W Standard light bulb

Energy Saving bulb 12W x 5 = 60W Standard light bulb

Energy Saving bulb 8W x 5 = 40W Standard light bulb

Now all you have to do is to choose .... at least you will know that they are saving electricity when you do convert over to them!

3 comments:

ShedSpot said...

Very interesting ...

Terie said...

We starting phasing out the bulbs in our house about 18 months ago. Amazing how much less energy is consumed with these new bulbs - they are not so great to look at but it's worth getting used to. This is good info. thanks for sharing.

App said...

I am going to have to disagree with you about the conversion rates.

Light isn't measured in wattage, it's measured in lumens.

There is a variance between bulbs, both standard and fluorescent, with regards to lumens per watt.

Your goal should be to get the most lumens you can for the least wattage.

Even if you don't make the change to fluorescent, you should still do this. Check the package and see the lumens a bulb has before you buy it. Then compare to other bulbs of other brands. You may find that a good quality 75W bulb gives off the same (or sometimes more) lumens than a cheap quality 100W.

The same applies to fluorescent bulbs. Always look for the lumens on the package and if you don't see it listed, don't buy it. That is almost always a sign of inferior quality.

If you want the same amount of light you have now, but switch from standard to fluorescent, then just look at the package from your current standard light bulbs and buy the same lumens in a fluorescent, going for as low of a wattage as you can that has the same lumens.